Why Does Reputation Matter So Much To Law Firms?

Why Does Reputation Matter So Much To Law Firms?

Most advertisements for legal firms tout the attorneys’ prowess in court, their determination to win a case, and their length of service in the industry. Reputation is of the highest importance to attorneys, because it drives a big portion of their demand among clients.

Why is this emphasis so strong in the legal profession compared to so many others? Why do clients judge firms so heavily on their reputation in the industry? There are some overall principles for any business to follow in building customer loyalty, but in the legal profession it comes down to a few basic points.

Client Reputation

People want to be known for using the best. They want a nice vehicle, name-brand clothing, and a home built by a renowned builder in a prestigious neighborhood.

When they need legal representation, they see it the same way. A reputable firm like Myler Disability not only will help see the case through to completion, it will also cast a positive light on the client. After all, we tend to estimate the legitimacy of someone’s legal case based on the type of attorney he or she has retained. If a known “ambulance chaser” is on the case, observers will scoff at the suit.

But when better-known firms like Myler Disability represent a client, people will see that the cause is legitimate and that the client is clearly deserving of a positive judgment.

High Stakes

While minor legal work is sometimes of minimal importance, most people are in real peril when they interact with the judicial system. They are attempting to gain disability benefits that will keep them financially secure for life, or they’re fighting to protect their parents’ estate from inheritance taxes and nursing home expenses. And of course, sometimes they’re trying to fight off a lawsuit–or win one.

Whatever the case may be, there is a lot at stake for the client. It could be money, property, business success, or even freedom. When everything a client has is potentially on the line in a legal situation, there is nothing more important to him or her than being served by a reputable attorney who will see the case through and vigorously protect the client’s interests.

Client Vulnerability

As a rule, the average citizen knows very little about the law. Generally, the most legal education that people normally have is whatever they retain from their various interactions with the law, be that a speeding ticket, a real estate purchase, or service as the executor of an estate.

Consequently, clients are at the mercy of people who know more about the law than they do, and they are aware of that. They are counting on an attorney to look out for their needs and make sure they are treated fairly. As a result, they want representation with a strong reputation for ethical, quality work.

Lack of Preparedness

Certain legal actions that we must take are on a fairly slow schedule. We reach retirement and decide it’s time to assemble a will, so we talk to a few friends to get some suggestions on what lawyer will do a good job with our final plans. From there, we kick around the options for a few months or years before finally making an appointment.

Other cases materialize unexpectedly. We have a car accident and need immediate help in recovering financial losses, or someone has diverted rainwater runoff onto our property and caused erosion. In these cases, reputations must already be in place or the client will never think of the attorney’s name.

Dealing with an attorney is a high-stress, high-stakes situation. We don’t know a lot of what we are doing, and we are sometimes on a very demanding time frame. The only way we can navigate through these trying times is to have legal representation from someone we already knew to be an effective, reputable attorney.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

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