The 15 Best Pieces of Advice for Aspiring Writers

The right words can be the difference between inspiring your employees or losing their confidence forever. They can make an application letter shine, ensuring you get that all-important foot in the door. And sometimes, well-chosen words can help us to envision a better world for everyone.

So given the value and power of words, Ivory Research decided to take a look at those who know how to wield them best. The academic writing service compiled a list of the best pieces of advice from 15 successful writers. And they added some tips on how you can apply them to your own life.

Nobel prize-winning poet Wisława Szymborska wrote a weekly advice column for aspiring authors for 13 years. Time and time again, Szymborska reminded new writers that you have to learn how to walk before you can run. And that it takes years of practice before you can actually fly.

“You’ve managed to squeeze more lofty words into three short poems than most poets manage in a lifetime,” wrote Szymborska in one piece of feedback. “But such words don’t come cheap. Let’s take the wings off and try writing on foot, shall we?”

Best-selling author Stephen King and Chronicles of Narnia creator C.S. Lewis are two more highly successful writers who believe in the first principle of keeping things simple. King, who has sold more than 300 million books worldwide, urges novice scriveners to always write in the active voice. And Lewis advises writers to reserve lofty words for the truly lofty moments. “Don’t use words too big for the subject,” said Lewis. “Otherwise, you’ll have no words left when you want to talk about something really [big.]”

Here’s all the other writing tips from some of the world’s greatest authors.

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